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Koi Varieties

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  • Karasugoi

    Karasugoi


    Karasugoi are Koi that are solid black.  When buying a Karasugoi, look for one with deep color. Check the fish over for any old scars or bad scales, for these will take away from the look of the Koi.


    Karasu or Karasugoi (kah' rah sue or kah' rah sue goy) Means "The crow" or black Nishikigoi with no white.


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  • Doitsu Karashigoi

    Doitsu Karashigoi

    Doitsu Karashigoi


    In Japanese Karashi translates into Mustard.
    This koi was bred by Yagenji.
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    Out of stock

  • Kohaku

    Kohaku

    The Kohaku is the most popular variety of Nishikigoi. So much so that there is an expression, "Koi avocation begins and ends with Kohaku." There are various tones of "red" color - red with thick crimson, light red, highly homogeneous red, blurred red, and so on.


    There are all sorts of "Kiwa (the edge of the pattern)" -scale-wide Kiwa, razor-sharp Kiwa, and Kiwa resembling the edge of a torn blanket, etc.


    Shades of white ground (skin) are quite diversified too -- skin with soft shade of fresh-unshelled, hardboiled egg, skin with hard shade of porcelain, yellowish skin, and so forth.

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  • Ogon

    Ogon


    The translation of the name Hikarimono can be broken up into two words; Hikari, meaning "shining" in Japanese, and mono, meaning "ones".


    The koi most commonly associated with this group are Ogon (formerly spelled Ohgon), but the classification also takes in metallic Matsuba. In 1921, a Magoi with a gold- striped back was caught from a river in Takezawa, Yamakoshi prefecture, by Sawata Aoki. Fascinated by this unusual carp, he and his son Hideyoshi embarked on a process of selective breeding, keeping back only those fish that showed some golden scalation.


    After four of five generations, Aoki succeeded in producing the forerunners of the Ogon - Ginbo and Kinbo, along with Kin Kabuto and Gin Kabuto. The latter had silver edges to their dark scales and a characteristic helmet- shaped head marking, rather like that found on today's ghost koi. All four types are still thrown in spawnings today, but are considered valueless. Aoki spawned the first true Ogon in 1946, the result of a union between a female Shiro Muji and eight males from his 25-year breeding program.


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  • Shusui

    Shusui


    Shusui have been crossbred between Doitsu Koi and Asagi, and their points for appreciation, therefore, are basically the same as those for Asagi.


    Shusui also have the tendency to show black spots in the head region as they grow big. Koi with spotless head region are valued highly, of course.


    The arrangement of scales is also important. It is desirable that scales are visible only the back and the regions of lateral lines -- no undesirable scales in any other place. Hi on the belly covering over the lateral lines are showy.


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  • Gin Rin Ghagoi

    Gin Rin Chagoi

    This koi bred by Marusho Tanaka.

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    Out of stock

  • Asagi

    Asagi

    <p><font size="2">oldest groups of koi.</font></p>
    <p><font size="2">Asagi are fairly classical from a genealogical point of view, and constitute a very tasteful variety. They usually have blue on the entire back and Hi on the belly, pectoral fins and gill covers. </font></p>
    <p><font size="2">The scales on the back have whitish base and thus collectively give an appearance of meshes of a net. </font></p>
    <p><font size="2">The important viewing points are conspicuously vivid appearance of the meshes and light blue, spotless head region. However, as they age, black spots often appear in the head region and Hi on the belly tend to climb up reaching as far as the back.</font></p>
    <p>The pictured koi was bred by <a href="#">Otsuka</a>.</p>
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  • Beni Kikokuryu

    Beni Kikokuryu


    Beni Kikokuryu is a koi that was bred from Kumonryu and Platinum Ogon. Beni Kikokuryu are white (shiro), black (sumi) and red (beni).  


    The pictured koi was bred by Kaneko.


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  • Goshiki

    Goshiki


    Goshiki are said to have been crossbred between Asagi and Taisho Sanshoku -- not yet an established theory, however. They also form a very tasteful variety of Nishikigoi. Goshiki used to be included in the Kawarimono group. However, with recent production of fairly excellent Goshiki, they are now being treated as an independent variety at Nishikigoi shows.


    Their red markings are similar in patterns to Kohaku, but may not be taken as seriously. Some scales of Asagi may also appear in the red markings. The meshes appearing only on the white ground will, on the other hand, contrast strikingly with mesh less Hi.


    The Goshiki in this picture came fro Hiroi.


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  • Gin Rin Tancho Kohaku

    Gin Rin Tancho

    Tancho Kohaku is a white koi with a red spot on its head.
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    Out of stock

  • Kin Ki Utsuri

    Kin Ki Utsuri


    Kin Hi Utsuri are arguably the most successful Hikariutsuri. The red in good specimens is bright crimson, and while the sumi may be toned down, this does mean that any shimis - normally the plague of Hi Utsuri - are less obvious. The pectoral fins - candy-striped black and white with a golden overlay - can practically glow.


    Head sumi is not generally as well defined as in Shiro Utsuri, and dark nostrils on an otherwise all-read head are a common fault.


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  • Kumonryu

    Kumonryu


    The Kumonryu is a Doitsu (German) koi that has a jet black pattern that emerges like billowing black clouds against a white background.


    The black pattern is variable and unstable, disappearing with changes in the water temperature, reappearing sometimes as a completely different pattern.


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